@factorygirlsatl

Maker Monday- Hannah Cross Ltd.

For our second installment of Maker Monday, we spoke with Hannah Hanlon, an Atlanta based artist, mother and the talent behind Hannah Cross Ltd.  If you aren't familiar, please do yourself a favor and check out her incredible collection of limited edition silk scarves here

FG: What do you wish you knew at the beginning of your career?

Hannah: I think just to capitalize on being naive. It's the time you can take big risks before knowing any better. 

Hannah and her inspiration photo by Jamie Hopper

Hannah and her inspiration photo by Jamie Hopper

FG: Who is your dream client?

Hannah: I've got a few in mind, but I'd love to do a philanthropic collaboration.

FG: Do trends influence your design?

Hannah: Not consciously. It's hard not to be influenced by what you see, but I hope I am more influenced by the world around me than fashion trends.

FG: If you weren’t a fashion designer, what would you do instead?

Hannah: I'd like to run an art school for kids.

FG: What rule do you believe is meant to be broken?

Hannah: Most of them. If I liked rules, I'd be in my former career.

FG: What was the most defining moment for you as a designer?

Hannah: I met Allan Fletcher and spent a day in his studio when I was living in London for a semester. I had never met someone who was spewing that kind of creative energy and passion before. 

FG: If you had to pick one outfit to wear every day for the rest of your life, what would it be?  

Hannah: Something black probably.

FG: What has been your biggest challenge as a designer?

Hannah: Being a designer is natural, the hard part is running your own business. It's great, but it requires a different type of discipline.

FG: Who has been the most influential person in your life? Why?

Hannah:I've been very fortunate to have a lot of incredible mentors, among them my childhood art teacher, my artist grandmother and my friend Mike Toth.

Inspiration for the next collection we can't wait to see!!   photo by Jamie Hopper

Inspiration for the next collection we can't wait to see!!  

photo by Jamie Hopper

FG HOUSELINE

We are very excited to announce our latest project- the Factory Girls House Line! 

This idea came about as we reflected on what we have learned from our first year, as well as where we wanted to go.  

Two things became apparent to us- 1. we needed a vehicle to improve our production practices and efficiency, and 2. we needed more funds to realize our vision of what we want the incubator to be.  Our house line is a way to address both of these by allowing us to experiment and train our staff on our own product, and at the same time create a revenue stream.  We also thought it would be wonderful to involve our community in the process, so we are inviting all of our friends on social media to decide which pieces we produce.  

The concept is simple- we create 2 similar styles and ask our peeps on Facebook and Instagram to decide which one we will actually make.  Also as a perk, everyone who votes is entered to win the style chosen.  Once voting ends, we produce a limited run of 25 of the winning style, and offer them for sale on our site and at pop up events.  

Our goal is to produce well made classic pieces that are accessible, and above all help us fund our incubator and give more resources to local designers.  We hope you enjoy them as much as we enjoy creating them!

Below is the first style voted on by you & made at The Factory!!

FG Houseline Maxi Dress
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Maker Monday: Abbey Glass

We are pleased to bring you a new series highlighting talented designers in the Southeast that we love.  For our first installment we talked with Abbey Glass, an up and coming Atlanta fashion designer and resident in the Factory Girls studios.   If you haven't seen her work check out her site here

FG: What do you wish you knew at the beginning of your career? 

AG: “I wish I knew more about retail and more about being a manager.  Managing a business is hard, so that would have been something that would have probably made me into a better business owner.” 

FG: What makes you unique from other designers? 

AG: “I have a lot of hand in my product. I don’t just sketch and have somebody else make patterns and produce.  I do all of my own pattern making, and then hand it off to an expert to perfect what I do.  I think that allows a lot more creativity in the process of making something because you can take things in different directions depending on how a muslin turns out.  You can capitalize on mistakes, sometimes things turn out to be better than you thought they were. I also think that for my age, I do less trendy clothing and less fast fashion oriented clothing which makes me different from most people who work in fashion that are my age.”  

FG: Who is your dream client? 

AG: “Michelle Obama! I definitely want to design for a very public woman who values where things are made and how they are made; also a woman of integrity and a leader.” 

FG: Do trends influence your design? 

AG: “Definitely; I think that they shape the body type I’m designing for and how tight or long something is. The core of what I do isn’t defined by trends, but there are a lot of nuances that you have to be influenced by being current to actually be in fashion and not look old fashioned. “

FG: If you weren’t a fashion designer, what would you do instead? 

AG: “I would probably be some kind of doctor.”

FG: What rule do you believe is meant to be broken? 

AG: “Matching. I think that not matching is very cool, and also wearing things in inappropriate ways is cool; like wearing something dressy to a BBQ or wearing something very dressed down at a gala is a rule that is meant to be broken.”

FG: What was the most defining moment for you as a designer? 

AG: “I think when I did the Supima Capsule Collection out of college.  It challenged me and made me design for real people and not just for myself.  I think that allowed me to see that I had some sort of commercial future, and it wasn’t just an artistic expression.”  

FG: If you had to pick one outfit to wear every day for the rest of your life, what would it be? 

AG: “Probably what I am wearing right now: a shapeless short tunic without sleeves.  Definitely not jeans!”

FG: What has been your biggest challenge as a designer? 

AG: “I think building a viable business and managing money has been really challenging.  I think editing the collection is hard too.” 

FG: Who has been the most influential person in your life? Why? 

AG: “I would say my parents have been the most influential people.  They have supported me since I have expressed interest in being a designer and created my own business.  They really help me through any obstacles I have been through.” 

FG: Tell us anything you want us to share- plans, hopes, dreams or upcoming events: 

AG: “We are excited about the collaboration with Britt Bass, and the upcoming spring collection.”

A sneak peak at Abbey's Spring 2016 moodboard featuring printed fabrics from Atlanta artist Britt Bass

A sneak peak at Abbey's Spring 2016 moodboard featuring printed fabrics from Atlanta artist Britt Bass

HELP START A MOVEMENT

Factory Girls has started an Indiegogo campaign and now we need your help!

We need the support of our community to reach our goal so we can help more designers realize their dreams. Your contribution will be paid forward to future designers and a skilled workforce for years to come.

Go to our Indiegogo campaign and see how you can help alter the fashion landscape in the South.

View the campaign by clicking above or by copy and pasting this URL in your browser:

https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/factory-girls-atlanta-s-first-fashion-incubator/x/7915545

Instant Gratification

This week the team at Factory Girls has been getting things produced and ready for the 2 trunk shows that Showroom Ampersand has coming up in the next few weeks.  We’ve been producing size runs and multiples of styles from Abbey Glass and Megan Huntz Spring/Summer 2014 collections which have been previously available only by pre-order. 

Size Runs of the Lorena Dress by Megan Huntz

Size Runs of the Lorena Dress by Megan Huntz

We are really excited to have pieces ready for people to take home.  I mean, all of us here at the Factory love shopping online or pre ordering items, but there is something about going to a store, finding something really special, taking it home, and wearing it out that night...Instant gratification!! To get that instant feel good experience, get yourself to Mooncake on May 3rd or Bill Hallman in the Highlands May 9th, or better yet just follow Showroom Ampersand on Instagram and Twitter for more info.   

Even though we want to deliver instant gratification to our Factory community, the process of delivery is definitely the opposite of that.  A topic of discussion around the Factory is fast fashion, and we want to stress how far away from that we are and always want to be. Fast fashion is like fast food. It’s easy, convenient, and sooooooooooo tempting, but we all know that it’s bad for us! Like that burger you just got from the drive thru will bloat you, that fast fashion dress you just picked up is only going to bloat your wardrobe. We don’t want to get preachy or anything, but chew on that for a bit. You’ll see that it goes down pretty easy. 

Slow Fashion from Abbey Glass. Digital print boxy tees and pleated skirts ready to be put together.

Slow Fashion from Abbey Glass. Digital print boxy tees and pleated skirts ready to be put together.

We also got a visit from You’ve Been Noted this week! You’ll have to check out our interview when it goes up, but in the meantime, get into their blog. They’ve got a great playlist by a Factory Girls Fave, DJ Speakerfoxxx and some great posts about other creatives around Atlanta. Actually, here's a photo of Speakerfoxxx in that pleated skirt from Abbey Glass we're producing:

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